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R. Berliner and A. D. Stoica are long time co-workers from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) with extensive experience in the development of neutron instrumentation. R. Berliner came from the Air Force Aerospace Research Laboratory to MURR in 1977 as Group Leader for Instrument Development. A. D. Stoica joined MURR in the 1990s to renew his collaboration with Mihai Popovici. They had previously worked together in Romania. A. D. Stoica is a consultant to IA.

Instrumentation Associates was formed by R. Berliner and Jeanne Hilker-Draper (another MURR Instrument Development group member) in the early 1980s to supply instrument control electronics and computer interfaces for neutron and X-Ray diffraction instrumentation. Ms. Draper left MURR and IA in the 1990s and the company continued, later to be incorporated after the University removed its support for neutron scattering at MURR, the programs collapsed and the staff scattered.

At MURR, as Group leader for Instrument Development and for a period as Group Leader for Neutron Scattering, R. Berliner was heavily involved in the design and construction of the neutron instruments, instrument control and detector systems. In addition to the work on instrument development, he was engaged in research on phase transitions and structure of the alkali metals as well as the study of cement and concrete using neutron methods. Leaving MURR in 2000, R. Berliner moved to the University of Michigan Department of Nuclear Engineering as a Research Professor at the Ford Nuclear Reactor, leaving there for the staff of the Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University in 2004 when the Ford Reactor was closed. Along the way, IA was the recipient of a Phase I and subsequently Phase II SBIR grant (“A GEM of a Neutron Detector”) for the development of GEM based neutron detectors. In 2008, R. Berliner left NCSU to operate IA full time.  


A. 
D. Stoica left MURR in 1999 for the SNS where he is currently a member of the Neutron Scattering Science Division.